Archive for August, 2009

Petermann Glacier ice area loss in 2009 has been gradual, not abrupt, so far

Sunday, August 30th, 2009

Petermann Glacier ice area loss is that it has been gradual, a little at a time, no big all-at-once 100 sq km area loss. With Greenpeace support, we’d installed time lapse cameras and GPS. Surprise was that what we observed was a gradual ice area loss and not yet to the tune of the expected 100 sq km ice area loss. So far, the area loss is ~10 sq km.

This image illustrates Petermann’s current state, with ice loss from the northern (right) side, including the loss of unconsolidated glacier ice that was at once trapped. Now, ~20 km of northern flank is not at all buttressed by glacier ice jam, see below…

MODIS_Petermann_29_Aug_2009.jpg

Image Caption: Petermann Glacier 29 Aug, 2009.

returning from Greenland

Saturday, August 29th, 2009

It’s always interesting to learn that one does not require many possessions. I’ve gotten used to living out of a duffel bag.

Yesterday, I should have returned to the US, but 40 minutes after take off, we turned around with a failed back door hydraulic lock… another day in Kangerlussuaq.

It’s been another great trip. The hallmark of this trip may be: gathered more data than you have time to analyze…perhaps I should take next year off and relax at home and do data reduction. Yet, we have great plans for next year I’ll be writing about soon.

I also indend to post a synopsis of this summer in Greenland.

Stay tuned!

Ice Plate Trackers

Sunday, August 2nd, 2009

02 August 2009

Recently analysis of the positions of the ‘Ice Island Trackers’ on ice Plate_A and Plate_D indicate no detachment from the Petermann Glacier, so far . The iceberg trackers are very useful for ‘early warning’, especially, as the Greenpeace ship ‘Arctic Sunrise’ is currently located in front of the Humboldt glacier, 120 kilometer south of the Petermann Glacier.

The images below illustrate
a. Dr. Jason E. Box installing an ‘ice plate tracker’ on Plate_D of the Petermann Glacier on 15 July 2009.  The ‘ice plate trackers’ will become significant if ‘Petermann Glacier Plate_D’ detaches from the glacier and becomes ‘Petermann Glacier Ice Island_D’.
b. Dr. Alan Hubbard returning to the Greenpeace helicopter after checking the Dr. Alberto Behar, NASA JPL, provided ‘expendable GPS’ to the left of the ‘Ice Island Tracker / Detachment Early Warning tracker’.
c. Petermann Glacier Plate_D, 21 July 2009

Dr. Jason E. Box installing an \'ice plate tracker\' on Plate_D of the Petermann Glacier

Dr. Jason E. Box installing an ‘ice plate tracker’ on Plate_D of the Petermann Glacier on 15 July 2009.

Dr. Alan Hubbard returning to the Greenpeace helicopter after checking \'expendable GPS\'.

Dr. Alan Hubbard returning to the Greenpeace helicopter after checking the
‘expendable GPS’ provided by Dr. Alberto Behar, NASA JPL; 15 July 2009.

\'Petermann Glacier Plate_D\', 21 July 2009

Petermann Glacier Plate_D

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transcribed from email from Jason E. Box by JRBox
Byrd Polar Research Center
guest scientist on Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise